amandaonwriting
amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Cyril Connolly, born 10 September 1903, died  26 November 1974
Seven Quotes
Better to write for yourself and have no public, than to write for the public and have no self.
While thoughts exist, words are alive and literature becomes an escape, not from, but into living.
Literature is the art of writing something that will be read twice.
Our memories are card-indexes consulted and then put back in disorder by authorities whom we do not control.
There are only three things which make life worth living: to be writing a tolerably good book, to be in a dinner party of six, and to be travelling south with someone whom your conscience permits you to love.
No education is worth having that does not teach the lesson of concentration on a task, however unattractive. These lessons, if not learnt early, will be learnt, if at all, with pain and grief in later life.
A great writer creates a world of his own and his readers are proud to live in it. A lesser writer may entice them in for a moment, but soon he will watch them filing out.
Connolly was an English intellectual, literary critic and writer. He was the editor of Horizon literary magazine from 1940 to 1949. He is known for writing Enemies of Promise.
Source for Image
by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

amandaonwriting:

Happy Birthday, Cyril Connolly, born 10 September 1903, died  26 November 1974

Seven Quotes

  1. Better to write for yourself and have no public, than to write for the public and have no self.
  2. While thoughts exist, words are alive and literature becomes an escape, not from, but into living.
  3. Literature is the art of writing something that will be read twice.
  4. Our memories are card-indexes consulted and then put back in disorder by authorities whom we do not control.
  5. There are only three things which make life worth living: to be writing a tolerably good book, to be in a dinner party of six, and to be travelling south with someone whom your conscience permits you to love.
  6. No education is worth having that does not teach the lesson of concentration on a task, however unattractive. These lessons, if not learnt early, will be learnt, if at all, with pain and grief in later life.
  7. A great writer creates a world of his own and his readers are proud to live in it. A lesser writer may entice them in for a moment, but soon he will watch them filing out.

Connolly was an English intellectual, literary critic and writer. He was the editor of Horizon literary magazine from 1940 to 1949. He is known for writing Enemies of Promise.

Source for Image

by Amanda Patterson for Writers Write

nprfreshair
nprfreshair:

Today Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell. Corrigan says the novel gives readers “the chance to step out of time for a while and into a world richer and stranger than most of us could imagine.” 
She encourages readers to try The Bone Clocks, even if fantasy fiction isn’t your cup of tea: 

"David Mitchell is one of those writers I’d follow anywhere—even deep into (what is for me) the often-exasperating genre of fantasy fiction.  I don’t naturally gravitate to tales about alternative universes, wormholes, or tribbles; but, there are always exceptions and if Mitchell feels like trying out a semi-futuristic vehicle about immortal soul stealers, I’m willing to take a deep breath, step aboard, and say, in the words of Rod Serling: “Next stop, the Twilight Zone.” 
As in Cloud Atlas and some of his lesser-known novels, Mitchell’s new book, called The Bone Clocks, is elaborately constructed, jumping around in time and narrative perspective.  A friend of mine, who’s also a Mitchell enthusiast, rightly says that his novels are “postmodernist without all the pretentious metaphysics.”  What my friend means is that Mitchell’s technical wizardry is there, not for show, but in service to his themes and characters—he’s a deeply compassionate writer.   In fact, despite its experimental edge, the main reason to read The Bone Clocks is an old-fashioned one:  the draw of a charismatic character named Holly Sykes.”

nprfreshair:

Today Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell. Corrigan says the novel gives readers “the chance to step out of time for a while and into a world richer and stranger than most of us could imagine.” 

She encourages readers to try The Bone Clocks, even if fantasy fiction isn’t your cup of tea: 

"David Mitchell is one of those writers I’d follow anywhere—even deep into (what is for me) the often-exasperating genre of fantasy fiction.  I don’t naturally gravitate to tales about alternative universes, wormholes, or tribbles; but, there are always exceptions and if Mitchell feels like trying out a semi-futuristic vehicle about immortal soul stealers, I’m willing to take a deep breath, step aboard, and say, in the words of Rod Serling: “Next stop, the Twilight Zone.” 

As in Cloud Atlas and some of his lesser-known novels, Mitchell’s new book, called The Bone Clocks, is elaborately constructed, jumping around in time and narrative perspective.  A friend of mine, who’s also a Mitchell enthusiast, rightly says that his novels are “postmodernist without all the pretentious metaphysics.”  What my friend means is that Mitchell’s technical wizardry is there, not for show, but in service to his themes and characters—he’s a deeply compassionate writer.   In fact, despite its experimental edge, the main reason to read The Bone Clocks is an old-fashioned one:  the draw of a charismatic character named Holly Sykes.”

observando

A doctor, a logician and a marine biologist had also just arrived, flown in at phenomenal expense from Maximegalon to try to reason with the lead singer who had locked himself in the bathroom with a bottle of pills and was refusing to come out till it could be proved conclusively to him that he wasn’t a fish. The bass player was busy machine-gunning his bedroom and the drummer was nowhere on board.

Frantic inquiries led to the discovery that he was standing on a beach on Santraginus V over a hundred light years away where, he claimed, he had been happy for over half an hour now and had found a small stone that would be his friend.

Douglas Adams (via observando)
lettersandlight

We Need Diverse Books: A Guide to Spotting and Growing Past Stereotypes

lettersandlight:

image

Throughout October, we’ll be partnering with We Need Diverse Books to bring you a series of blog posts full of helpful advice, tips, and suggestions for writing diversity convincingly and respectfully in your fiction—from people who know what they’re talking about. Today, Ellen Oh shares how to identify, then expand beyond stereotypes:

One of the most common mistakes I see when people try to write diversely is that they fall into the practice of writing a positive stereotype. After all, if it’s positive, it can’t be a stereotype, right?

Wrong.

A stereotype is a positive or negative set of beliefs about the characteristics of a group of people. Just because it is positive, doesn’t make it any less problematic.

Why?

Read More

observando
Writers shouldn’t fear criticism. Instead, they should fear silence. Criticism is healthy. It gets people thinking about your work and, even better, it gets them talking and arguing. But as for silence — it is the greatest killer of writers. So if you hate a book and want to hurt it — don’t talk about it. And if you hate my books — please, for God’s sake, shout it from the hills!
Robert Fanney (via observando)